Gender Pay Reporting Revealed

The first deadline for companies with 250 or more employees to publish their gender pay gap figures has now passed. The data collected, whilst imperfect (not accounting for full time versus part time/long serving employees or comparing like for like jobs), does appear to suggest an inherent inequality of opportunity, with almost 78% of companies paying men more than women and an average median pay gap of 9.7%.

Somewhat surprisingly, retail companies reported some of the largest gender pay gaps notwithstanding that their workforces are largely made up of women: Karen Millen having a median hourly pay gap rate of 49% and women’s median bonus pay being 96% lower than men’s. Coast also reported a median pay gap of 40.26%, Phase Eight, 54.5% and ASOS 40.9%. Benefit Cosmetics, whose workforce is 95% female, also published a median gap of 30.7%.

A number of companies have sought to justify their pay gaps by stating that they have more men in senior positions which, whilst might explain the gender pay gap results, is not in itself a winning argument when discussing gender inequality.

Whether or not the figures are truly representative of the gender pay gap however, it cannot be denied that the reporting requirements have brought a fresh focus on this issue and are forcing transparency as to internal pay and promotion structures and the need to increase women on boards. This, together with the online #PayMeToo campaign, launched by Stella Creasy and a cross-party group of female MPs, will hopefully ensure that all employers (whether they are required to report their gender pay gap or not) will be alive to the issues of gender inequality within the workplace and will strive to eradicate it.

All reports are available to search: https://gender-pay-gap.service.gov.uk/

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GDPR for Employers

Okay, so you’re getting your data protection house in order, and now it’s time to think about your own workers, and what you need to do with them in relation to GDPR.

The good news is that, provided you aren’t doing anything devious with your workers’ personal data, you probably already have sufficient legal justification for processing the personal data of your employees and workers, without the need for additional consents.

The bad news is that your current contracts, policies and procedures will still be out of date from May 2018 (probably).

So, what do you need to do? Here are a few points to get you started:

• You need to put in place a transparent and understandable data protection policy and privacy notice for your employees and workers. This is easier said than done. Data protection is dry, technical and complex, while some of your workers may have only had a limited education. Part of your responsibility is to help ensure that all workers are enabled to understand your legal justification for processing their data, and what their rights are in respect of that data. The old long-winded legalistic data protection policies, which lawyers pored over for hours on end, may, sadly, need to be scrapped.

• Consents, where needed, cannot be buried in contracts or policies. They will need to be separate and distinct. They will also need to be focussed and clear in respect of what they relate to. You will, therefore, probably need to change the wording of your standard contracts of employment or engagement.

• You need to maintain a record of consents (if there are any) and provide an easy mechanism for workers to withdraw such consent whenever they wish.

• You should not seek consent for the processing of personal data where you have another legal justification for processing it – otherwise it might create a misleading impression for a worker in relation to their own rights (i.e. they might think they can withdraw consent, when they can’t).

• You must make sure that you only retain the personal data you need, for as long as you need it. You will need to have in place a transparent data retention policy and share that with your workers.

• While most of this will be handled by your HR team and covered in your staff handbook, you’ll need to think differently about how you deal with job applicants (who might not otherwise have access to your full policies). You might therefore decide to develop and implement a separate, recruitment specific, privacy notice and data protection policy for sharing with all job applicants (even speculative candidates).

• If you operate a candidate bank, you may need to obtain consent from some of those candidates if they have not freely given consent to your retaining their details for future opportunities.

• On a practical level, you will need to map and cleanse the personal data you hold relating to your workers and employees (and ex-workers and ex-employees) so you know what information you hold, and where you hold it.

• You will also need to look at how you secure that data, and make sure that appropriate procedures are implemented and followed so that personal data is only stored in the places and by the persons approved to do so, and that it is only processed for the permitted reasons.

• If you use an outsourced payroll provider, or you engage with any other external service providers with whom you share workers’ data, then you’ll need to ensure that you have appropriate data processing agreements in place.

Finally, it is worth bearing in mind that one size does not fit all when it comes down to data protection compliance under the GDPR. That means that you might need to do more than is outlined above to be compliant yourselves.

If you have any questions about the points raised in this article, please contact Matt Huddleson at Matt.Huddleson@otbeveling.com.

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Introduction to the GDPR

The GDPR will come into force on 25 May 2018 – regardless of Brexit – and the new regime will:

• Give individuals more rights over their data and the way it is used
• Impose more onerous obligations on businesses
• Introduce fines of up to €20 million (or 4% of global annual group turnover if this is larger) for failure to comply

Who does it apply to?

The GDPR will apply to any organisation that processes and holds the data of individuals who are inside the EU, even if the organisation itself is based outside the EU.

The UK is implementing a new Data Protection Act, which will ensure that the GDPR continues to apply to the UK, even after its departure from the EU.

Individuals rights

Data subjects (the individual that the personal data relates to) will have the right to:

1. Be informed
2. Access their data (free of charge)
3. Have their data rectified
4. Have their data erased (the “Right to be forgotten”)
5. Have the processing of their data restricted
6. Data portability (copying or transferring data from one IT environment to another).
7. Object to their data being processed

They also have rights related to automatic decision-making and profiling.

Data processors (the businesses who collect or use the data) will have to comply with all the above rights or risk being fined.

Obligations on Data Processors

Businesses who are Data Processors must:

1. Have a lawful basis for processing data

There are 6 grounds which processors can rely on in order to lawfully process data, including obtaining the data subjects consent, or for the business’ “legitimate interests.”

2. Implement “privacy by design” and “privacy by default”

The GDPR requires processors to ensure that privacy and data protection is considered early on in a project and is embedded throughout the lifespan of the project rather than just an afterthought.

3. Check whether they need to appoint a “Data Protection Officer”

Businesses must appoint a Data Protection Officer if:
• they are a public authority;
• carry out large scale systematic monitoring of individuals, special categories of data or data relating to criminal convictions and offences.
A Data Protection Officer must ensure the organisation remains compliant with the GDPR; keeping the business informed and advising where required.

4. Consider whether to carry out a “Privacy Impact Assessment”
Privacy Impact Assessments should be used to identify and reduce the privacy risks the privacy risks of an organisation’s projects.
How to prepare for the GDPR

Businesses should review their systems and processes now so that they are compliant before the 25 May 2018.

Most businesses will need to update their privacy policy, data retention and data protection policies, terms of business and their websites terms and conditions.

The GDPR’s requirements are too numerous to summarise here, but businesses should ensure they can comply with the above obligations and consider whether they should appoint a Data Protection Officer.

Our experience so far:

At OTB Eveling, we have been working with clients to help them prepare for the changes under the GDPR. We have produced our own GDPR audit questionnaire to enable our clients to assess what their organisations need to do to comply with the GDPR. We have then helped them identify the practical steps they need to take as a consequence of that audit process.

We have provided in-house training to clients and their staff to prepare them for the new requirements; and we have also been helping our clients update their policies, contracts and governance documentation to ensure that they are ready.

Typically, in our experience, clients have needed to review and update (or implement) the following documents and policies:

• Board Memorandum on GDPR
• Data Protection Policy
• Data/IT Security Policy
• Data Retention Policy
• Data Processing clauses for third party contracts
• Data Processing Agreements for third parties
• Standard form Staff handbook/policies – GDPR solution
• Employment contract – recommended GDPR/Data protection wording
• Suggested Employee consent to processing mechanism
• General consent for processing
• GDPR compliant privacy policy
• GDPR compliant website terms of use

We continue to support existing and new clients with this process. If you need support or have any questions about how the GDPR will affect your own business, please contact Annelie Carver (Annelie.Carver@otbeveling.com) or Matt Huddleson(matt.huddleson@otbeveling.com)

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Now is the time to restructure your management team!

Only if you need to, of course…

We are advising clients that if they are considering making changes to their senior team that may lead to expensive severance deals, then they should make those changes now if they hope to make use of the current tax regime.

Upcoming changes to tax rules will make it more expensive to agree severance deals with departing executives and employees, particularly those with higher salaries and large severance packages, from 6 April 2018.

The most significant change will take away the ability of businesses to make tax free payments in lieu of notice (“PILONs”). Up to now, it has been possible to pay tax-free PILONs if there is no contractual PILON clause in an individual’s service agreement or contract of employment (up to a limit of £30,000), and this is often used to reach a “win win” deal on a severance package with a high paid departing employee.

Because of this change, all PILON sums (including those paid under a settlement agreement) will be subject to income tax and NICs on the basic pay element, in the same way as they would have if the full notice period had been worked. This will impact upon severance deals for executives and employees with a termination date on or after 6 April 2018. In short, severance deals will become more expensive for employers.

Another notable change (although this is only due to take effect from April 2019) is that employers will also be required to pay employer’s NICs on any part of a “Termination Payment” (i.e. the severance payment above the PILON) that exceeds a £30,000 threshold. Previously, although income tax was due (and to be deducted) on these sums, employers NICs were not payable. This also includes termination payments to officers such as non-executive directors.

Although we have focussed on the issue of high value severance packages, the principle also applies to organisation-wide restructures.

There are also other changes coming into force at the same time, for instance “non-statutory contractual redundancy payments” will no longer automatically fall within the £30,000 exemption, although “Statutory Redundancy Payments” still do. We recommend that businesses take tax advice (from an appropriately qualified accountant) in relation to all proposed severance payment arrangements taking effect after the start of April 2018, at least until they get used to the new regime.

Businesses have a window of opportunity, between now and the start of April 2018, to make the changes that they have been thinking about. After that time, negotiations with departing senior executives, in particular, will need to be approached in a different way.

Finally, as there is now no tax benefit to businesses excluding PILONs from their standard service agreements and employment contracts; they should (at some point) reconsider the pros and cons of whether contractual PILON clauses would in fact be useful to them.

More information can be found at the gov.uk website here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/income-tax-and-national-insurance-contributions-treatment-of-termination-payments/income-tax-and-national-insurance-contributions-treatment-of-termination-payments

Matt Huddleson regularly advises clients on team restructures and organisational changes. If you are affected by any of the issues raised above you can contact him at matt.huddleson@otbeveling.com.

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Road Transport News – Ultra-Low Emission Zone in London

The Ultra-Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) comes into force on 8 April 2019, within the same area as the current Congestion Charging Zone (CCZ). Most vehicles will need to meet exhaust emission standards (ULEZ standards) or pay a daily charge, when travelling in central London. If the vehicle does not meet the ULEZ emissions standards and the daily charge is not paid, a Penalty Charge Notice (PCN) will be issued to the registered keeper. Cameras will read vehicle number plates as they are driven within the zone to check against the Transport for London (TFL) database. The ULEZ will operate 24 hours a day, every day of the year, including weekends and public holidays.

The ULEZ standards are in addition to the Congestion Charge and the Low Emission Zone requirements (LEZ).

The ULEZ standards are:
• Euro 3 for motorcycles, mopeds, motorised tricycles and quadricycles
• Euro 4 for petrol cars, vans, minibuses and other specialist vehicles
• Euro 6 for diesel cars, vans and minibuses and other specialist vehicles
• Euro VI for lorries, busses and coaches and other specialist heavy vehicles

The vehicle registration document or V5 will identify the vehicles Euro emission standard.

Transport for London have published a list of the vehicles affected by ULEZ and these include cars, small vans, large vans, 4 x 4 light utility vehicles, motorised horseboxes, ambulances, motorcaravans, mini buses, lorries, breakdown and recovery vehicles, snowploughs, gritters, road sweepers, concrete mixers, fire engines, buses and coaches.

TFL say that air pollution is one of the most significant challenges facing London and that transport is the biggest source of the emissions affecting the health of all Londoners. The introduction of the ULEZ will reduce exhaust emissions making central London a safer and more pleasant place to live, work and visit.

Paul Atkinson is a specialist lawyer in operator licensing compliance and road transport regulation. He regularly represents operators before the Traffic Commissioner at public inquiries and in the criminal courts.

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Road Transport News – Truck Platooning

The UK Government announced in August a fund of £8.1 million to fund a Truck Platooning Trial

Truck Platooning comprises a number of trucks closely following the other in an automated convoy. The vehicles are equipped with hi-tech driving systems and this forms a platoon with the trucks communicating electronically with each other.

The trucks drive close together at a constant speed, meaning lower fuel consumption and less CO2 emissions and with less space taken up on the road. When the lead truck brakes the following trucks in the platoon also brake immediately reducing reaction time and improving traffic safety. Platooning also saves fuel cost as the trucks drive close together at a constant speed.

The UK government announced in August a fund of £8.1 million to fund a platooning trial with tests set for public roads in 2018.

Richard Cuerden of The UK’s Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) said:
“We’re going to build a system that’s robust enough to work in the real world, and when we get to the end of our project, we’ll have run a trial with a real operator, real goods and on real UK roads.” On the issues of communication he said “They’re always able to talk with one another because trucks two and three can react so much quicker than you and I can so we can get them so much closer together”.

The vehicles are being built by engineering firm Ricardo and initial tests will be on a test track in platooning mode, simulating the vehicles moving together and then tests on real roads including a motorway or other major road.

What do you think of truck platooning? Is it the bright new future of haulage with less congestion and reduced CO2 emissions or is it more expense and taking control of the vehicle away from experienced lorry drivers?

Paul Atkinson is a specialist lawyer in operator licensing compliance and road transport regulation. If you would like any further information, please email paul.atkinson@otbeveling.com or call 01392 823 811.

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Getting Construction Contracts Right

Construction contracts, usually in the form of a JCT or RIBA, are used so often and contain so much information that a lot of contractors will not pay proper attention to their contents.
The temptation is to simply get on with the new work that has been won and use an old template contract, without really making sure that all if its contents are fit for the job.
Here are the top 5 things to check:

1. Parties Names
Make sure that you know who your contract is with and put it in the contract. Is your customer an individual, partnership or limited company? Are you contracting with a subsidiary or the parent company? Speak to your customer early on about who they think you are contracting with.
If you get this right then it avoids any problems in the future about, believe it or not whether there was ever a formal written contract and importantly who should be paying you.

2. Get it Signed
This happens more often than you would think. If both parties don’t sign it, there is scope to argue that its terms don’t apply – although there is case law that can impose the terms of an unsigned contract on parties, if the circumstances are right. But don’t run that risk.
If a contact isn’t expressly accepted by both sides, then you might miss out on vital protections such as the right to adjudicate or liquidated damages for delays.

3. Make sure you use the right contract
Use the right form contract for the right job. If you are carrying out a multi-million pound contract, you don’t want to use the JCT Minor Works Contract. It may seem like more work, but using the proper contract for the job will pay off by avoiding certain issues or, if things fall apart, dealing with issues in a way that is reflective of the contract price.

4. Get Your Notices right
Make sure you know, before you start work, what your rights are when it comes to notices. The time and manner when you should serve these is set out in the contract.
If you get them wrong, even serving one day late/early, you could give the other party the right to end the whole contract and claim damages. If in doubt, take legal advice.

5. Deal with problems quickly
If you think that you are falling out over the project, make sure you first check your contract about any notices you think you may have to serve, see 3 above, and then talk to the other party. The contract should also have provisions that tell you how to deal with a dispute. If the worst comes to the worst, you can take the problem to an adjudicator. It’s a quick and easy way of resolving the issue and often doesn’t cause the contract to fall apart.

Nine out of ten problems can be resolved without Court or adjudication proceedings. You may want to take legal advice before you do anything to make sure you aren’t compromising yourself.

This information is not intended to legal advice. If you have any questions regarding any construction issue, please contact Michael Clarkmichael.clark@otbeveling.co.uk 01392 829245.

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The continued pitfalls of residential lettings

Despite new legislation affecting assured shorthold tenancies (AST) coming into force in 2015 and 2016, landlords are still falling foul of certain requirements. If a residential property is let to a tenant under an AST and the law hasn’t been complied with, there can be serious consequences. Here is our bite size guide.

DO:

1. Ensure that you check that anyone over the age of 18 who will be living in your property has the right to be in the UK.

If you fail to do this, and it is found that those living in your property don’t have the right to be in the UK, then you could face a fine and/or be sent to prison. You are required to see and take copies of original identification of all those who are over 18 and will be residing in the property – irrespective of whether they are on the tenancy agreement or whether they are British or not.

2. Have an up to date tenancy agreement in place.

You should ensure that your tenancy agreement is up to date. It’s easy to keep using an old tenancy agreement without realising that it’s no longer compatible with modern legal requirements.

3. Place any deposit you take from a tenant into an authorised tenancy deposit scheme and serve notice of this on the tenant.

Deposits must be placed in a scheme within 30 days of being taken and the notice must be served on the tenant within 30 days of that. Either have the tenant sign something to confirm receipt or email it to them and ask them to confirm receipt.
If you don’t pay the deposit into a scheme, any subsequent section 21 notice served on the tenant will be invalid. It will also give the tenant the right to claim compensation of up to three times the value of the deposit and a Court may also order that you pay back the deposit at the same time.

4. Serve the ‘How to rent – the checklist for renting in England’ booklet, an up to date EPC certificate and a Gas Safety Certificate (if there is gas at the property) on the tenant before the tenancy starts.

The best practice for evidencing this would be to serve these documents on the tenant at the same time as they sign the tenancy agreement. They should also sign to confirm that they have received them all.

DON’T:

1. Ignore any requests by tenants for you to carry out repairs.

If a tenant complains, in writing, about repairs that need to be done, you must respond within 14 days. The nature of that response will of course depend on whether you are obliged to carry out the repairs complained of.
If you fail to respond within the 14 days or fail to carry out the works, the tenant can complain to the local authority. If the local authority then serve a notice on you to carry out the repairs, you will not be able to serve a section 21 notice on the tenant for a period of 6 months – even if you have carried out the work.
The rules on carrying out repairs, at this time, only apply to tenancies that started from 1 October 2015.

2. Assume that all section 21 notices are the same.

Due to a change in law in 2015 regarding section 21 notices, the form and content of the notice you need to serve depends on when the tenancy started. If it began before 1 October 2015, the old rules regarding section 21 notices apply. If it started after that date, the section 21 notice needs to be in a specific format and it can’t be served until the first 4 months of the tenancy has expired.

3. Forget to register a partial deposit.

If you agree to take the deposit in instalments, you are obliged to place it in a deposit scheme and serve notice on the tenant when you take the first one. Any further instalments must also be placed in the scheme; however you do not need to serve notice on the tenant for each one.

If you think that you may be in breach of any of the rules, the important thing is to take legal advice immediately. There may steps that you can take to reduce any damage that could occur and we can offer you a no obligation, free telephone consultation to discuss any concerns you might have.

This information is not intended to legal advice. If you have any questions regarding any landlord and tenant issue, please contact Michael Clark at michael.clark@otbeveling.co.uk.

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Property Litigation Case Law Update – June 2017

Sutton and East Surrey Water Plc -v- Kilby [2017] UK UT 248 [LC]

This recent decision from the Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber) is a reminder to land owners that restrictive covenants are not always enforceable and those seeking to enforce a covenant must have the standing to do so. An objectors’ failure to prove that they are entitled to the benefit of the covenant means they have no grounds to enforce it and no standing to bring an objection to its removal or modification.

Facts

In this case Sutton and East Surrey Water owned Woodcote Reservoir in Purley, Surrey. The land was subject to a restriction dating back to July 1910 which prohibited the land being used for any trade or business (other than the construction of the reservoir) and further prohibited any building upon the land apart from a recorder house (which was to be in accordance with elevations previously approved by a William Webb). In addition, the reservoir was subject to a covenant preventing anything being carried out on the land which would become a nuisance or annoyance to Mr Webb or the adjoining owners.

Sutton and East Surrey wanted to develop the site by constructing two blocks of flats, which would clearly be a breach of the restrictive covenants. Given the age of the covenant, it made an application to the Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber) to modify or discharge the covenants. A number of local residents objected to the application on the basis that the proposed development would have an adverse effect on their properties.

The Law

In order to have standing to object to the application, the local residents had to establish that they were entitled to the benefit of the covenants and, only upon being satisfied that they were, could the Tribunal consider their objections. Each resident’s standing had to be considered on a property by property basis.

In order for subsequent owners to benefit from a restrictive covenant, it is necessary to show that the benefit of the covenant has been passed to them as successor either by assignment of the benefit, by a building scheme (which is effectively a scheme of mutually enforceable restrictive covenants most typically on an estate), or by the benefit annexing to the land owned by the objector.

It is easier to prove annexation for covenants imposed on or after 1 January 1926 because section 78 of the Law Property Act 1925 provided that the benefit of all restrictive covenants granted on or after that date would automatically annex to the land.

The Findings

It was clear that the first two potential arguments for the benefit passing did not apply as there was no evidence of either and, therefore, in order to demonstrate that they were entitled to enforce the covenants the residents needed to show annexation and the test they needed to satisfy was that the benefiting land could be readily identified. This is typically evidence by the wording in the document reserving the covenants, for example by use of the words “for the benefit of the adjoining land edged red on the attached plan”. Any wording which clearly demonstrates that the benefit attaches to a particular piece of land would normally be sufficient.

The difficulty in this case was that the 1910 conveyance was not available, nor had the Land Registry retained a copy as it had simply noted the burden of the covenants on Sutton and East Surrey’s title. The extract used by the Land Registry on the title did not set out the identity of the parties to the 1910 conveyance, nor did it include the wording which would have come before the restrictive covenants.

Based on the extract, the Tribunal concluded that it was William Webb who conveyed the land in 1910 and further concluded that he owned other land in the vicinity at that time. However, it was impossible for the Tribunal to conclude what land he owned and, based on the evidence it had, it could certainly not readily ascertain the benefitting land.

Further, the Tribunal concluded that at least part of the restrictive covenants benefitted William Webb personally (there was reference specifically to him) and this would suggest the covenants were intended to be enforceable by him, rather than annexed to the land.

The residents argued that the covenants should be considered more broadly because the covenant concerning nuisance specifically referenced adjoining owners. However, the Tribunal found that in fact this made it more likely that Mr Webb’s intention was not to annex the benefit to an identifiable area of land, because he could have done so expressly if he was so minded. The Tribunal considered that Mr Webb could have imposed this restriction to protect himself from complaints by adjoining owners and the reference could not be concluded as giving an indication that the adjoining owners should have the benefit of the covenant in their own right.

It follows that the Tribunal concluded that the owners were not able to show that they enjoyed the benefit of the covenant and, therefore, had not standing to object to Sutton and East Surrey’s application, which was successful.

Going forward

Whilst this case simply confirms the current position as regards the enforcement of restrictive covenants, it is a useful reminder to land owners that just because a restrictive covenant binds the land, it does not necessarily mean that it is still enforceable. A thorough investigation should be carried out into enforceability, and subsequently, the potential to apply for modification or discharge before entering into any negotiations concerning a potential breach of that covenant. Land owners should also be aware that if negotiations are entered into with potential benefitees, this may well preclude the ability to obtain indemnity insurance (which, in circumstances where it can be demonstrated that there is nobody, or nobody identifiable, that has the benefit of the covenant, may be a cheap solution to enable development despite a restrictive covenant on the title). It should also be considered whether, particularly in the context of residential development, indemnity insurance will be adequate to enable properties to be sold following development and whether this will impact upon value. If there are concerns about the impact on value, or marketability of the properties, the cost of an application to the Tribunal may well be justified.

If you have any questions about the issues raised in this update please contact Charlotte Curtis on 01392 829221 or by email to charlotte.curtis@otbeveling.com. Charlotte is an experienced property litigator who regularly deals with restrictive covenant issues and can advise both at the early stages of proposed developments, or in connection with applications to the Tribunal.

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New Head of Employment joins OTB Eveling

OTB Eveling are delighted to announce the arrival of Matt Huddleson to lead our commercially focused employment team, significantly adding to our employment capability to support our niche corporate/commercial offering.

MattHuddleson

Managing Partner, James Eveling, comments:

“Matt’s appointment brings more experience and expertise to our growing employment law practice and a more developed offering to the mid-market, which otherwise might not get access to the type of support that is often reserved for large corporates. Those clients who are most likely to benefit from this will be our core client base of medium sized businesses; or other organisations who are about to go through change.”

OTB Eveling’s employment team will build upon its proven track record of providing legal support to businesses in relation to employment and people matters, as well as transactional support. Matt’s appointment extends our capability so that we also provide:

• Strategic consultancy advice on organisational and people matters.
• Project leadership and support (people and organisational projects).
• Board level advice and support, either to the whole Board or individual Board Members (challenging or sensitive people issues).
In relation to his appointment, Matt says:

“Our clients’ commercial objectives are our primary consideration in relation to any matters we are supporting them with. Employment and people issues can be frustrating for, and a huge distraction from, business. By working in partnership with our clients we can take responsibility for and ownership of issues that are otherwise pulling them away from focussing on their core business”

We will continue to provide the level of service and support that our clients are used to. As part of this we help medium sized private sector businesses either facing challenging or disruptive people related issues or problems, or embarking upon a process of change or transformation, to identify and implement commercially appropriate and legally robust plans and solutions, allowing those clients to focus on their core business activities and objectives.”

Matt’s extensive experience includes organisational, outsourcing, restructuring projects and staff transfers for a wide range of clients up to and including multinational corporates. He is also an experienced and successful TUPE specialist and advocate; and has supported clients on a broad range of employment and people issues including day to day employment relations, employment litigation and industrial relations.

Matt joined us at the beginning of June 2017 having spent more than 10 years at a fast growing top 100 regional firm, where he led a 20-strong team. He trained with international law firm Reed Smith and has more than 15 years’ experience in the employment field. He has been ranked as a Leader in his Field in Legal 500 and Chambers and Partners since 2012, and is known for his strategic advisory offering.

You can reach Matt at matt.huddleson@otbeveling.com

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